state:
Minnesota
Local history:
Carceral Colonialism: Imprisonment in Indian Country
How has settler colonialism shaped the carceral state?
University of Minnesota
National Traveling Venue:
Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota
405 21st Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55454-0420
September 1, 2018September 30, 2018

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 4:30PM
Real Madness: Warehousing People with Mental Illness in Prisons
Northampton Public Library Coolidge Museum
20 West Street
Northampton, MA 01060

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Minnesota: Carceral Colonialism: Imprisonment in Indian Country
How has settler colonialism shaped the carceral state?
University of Minnesota

Settler colonialism has involved denying Native people sovereignty and access to land and resources. It has also produced high rates of incarceration of American Indians in Minnesota and the country. How? For over two centuries, American Indians have been forcibly removed from their lands and homes. This history of removal has been achieved through unfair treaties that created the reservation system; systemic violence and warfare, including moving Dakota people into a concentration camp at the US military outpost Fort Snelling and the execution of 38 Dakota men during the US-Dakota War 1862-3; the takeover of tribal jurisdiction; and taking children from their families and placing them in boarding schools. Mass incarceration continues this pattern of removal by displacing Native people from communities and transferring power to others through gerrymandering and other means.

Today, as always, Native Minnesotans resist carceral colonialism through acts of cultural preservation and political activism.

Our Point of View

University of Minnesota undergraduate and graduate students worked across disciplines to investigate the disproportionate rate of American Indian incarceration in the state. We brought together archival sources, community interviews, and statistical data to establish a case for Carceral Colonialism; by exploring the incarceration and surveillance of Native bodies, and the resistance to these measures, we aim to illuminate the carceral patterns of indigenous communities across time and space.

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Minnesota: Carceral Colonialism: Imprisonment in Indian Country    University of Minnesota
How has settler colonialism shaped the carceral state?
Minnesota: Carceral Colonialism: Imprisonment in Indian Country
How has settler colonialism shaped the carceral state?
  University of Minnesota

National Exhibition Venue    Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota

Public Dialogues and Events
| September 1 – September 30, 2018

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